About

I'm a twenty-one-year-old Mass Communications Major currently studying at Emory & Henry college in Appalachia. I've been published in The Weekly Standard and The Torrey Gazette, and I write regularly for the Whitetopper.

You're here for one of two reasons (probably.) Either you've been reading the cultural commentary, or the British detectives stuff. As you can imagine, the two topics don't always mesh tremendously well, but happily, you can filter through them by following my Tumblr Murder! 'Orrible Murder! for the detectives, and my Facebook page for the cultural commentary.

So, back to me.

If I had to name one author who's had the greatest impact on my life, I'd have to say J.R.R. Tolkien. The Lord of the Rings is my all-time favorite book. I grew up holding fast to the sentiment that "There's some good in this world, and it's worth fighting for." Unknowingly, I aligned myself with the ideology of the Christian patriot (as Tolkien did purposefully). I discovered that idea in the marvelous book Orthodoxy, by G.K. Chesterton.
The world is not a lodging-house at Brighton, which we are to leave because it is miserable. It is the fortress of our family, with the flag flying on the turret, and the more miserable it is the less we should leave it. The point is not that this world is too sad to love or too glad not to love; the point is that when you do love a thing, its gladness is a reason for loving it, and its sadness a reason for loving it more.
I've quoted that passage so many times that my readers (all two or three of them) must be sick of it by now, but in many ways, it completely summarizes my philosophy. I refuse to cave to pessimism or optimism. This world is a fixer-upper. We're here to do the fixing.

I have lots of different interests, and love to muse on them. I am prone to wax (or wane) eloquent on British detective shows, the State Of The World, theology, politics, or a dozen other things. To spare people in real life having to endure this, I inflict it upon the internet.

I do spend a lot of time on Twitter, so follow me there, or go like Longish on Facebook.

Anyway...in a nutshell, come here to hear much talk about politics, religion, murder mysteries, writing, and Chesterton. I am Hannah Long, and it tends to take me a Longish time to say things...

Longish

14 comments:

  1. Found you through Eric Metaxas and love what I've read so far.

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    1. Thanks! Make sure to follow on Facebook for updates. :)
      https://www.facebook.com/longishfanpage

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  2. Hello! I don't know how, but I was looking for something on Figment and I remembered you as Eowyn (blast from the past!) and that I liked reading your stories and somehow I ended up here. Nice blog, I would follow you but my own blog is on Tumblr and I don't have an account here.

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  3. Found you through a Kevin Williamson retweet. OVERJOYED to find a fellow British Detective fan! I thought I was the only person in Appalachia (Is Arkansas Appalachia?) to have discovered Morse. Consider me a regular listener to your podcast now! Congratulations on your Weekly Standard review--so exciting!

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    1. Wow! Thank you on all fronts. And you're certainly not the only Morse fan in Appalachia - not only my family, but several people I know like British detectives (and I'm always making converts, usually via the gateway drug, Sherlock). Glad to hear from you! Keep in touch.

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  4. Hi, Hannah. I hadn't read this page. I too am a Christian. I had a powerful experience at university when I was your age. Changed my life forever. In my dotage, I read a lot of theology (Tom Wright is my favorite author but I read a lot of others, old and new, as well). For light relief, it's British detectives!

    I like quite a few of the many you list but there are others I don't care for. Because of my age, I've read and seen a lot over the years. I love the 90s Maigret, for example, but the 60s one also made a big impression on me when I was just a kid. Very little of that has survived. I really like the books as well.

    Foyle's War is another favorite. Very much my parents' time. I can relate to it as I came along not long afterwards and spent my childhood playing on the bombed sites of Central London and on the river. It was still Dickens' London. About half a mile from where I was born, in a small park behind a church, is the last remaining piece of the wall of the debtor's gaol where Dickens' father was imprisoned. As a child, Dickens worked nearby.

    Keep up the good work!

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    1. To detail the circumstances of my own conversion would be a long and possibly impossible task - it took place very slowly, and involved the influence of many sources, Tolkien's writing one of them. But I've always been surrounded by Christians who encouraged me to think for myself, so I'd mostly sorted out my biggest faith issues by the time college rolled around. That said, it's been a bit of a rollercoaster.

      Bear in mind, while I reviewed or mentioned many of those shows - that doesn't necessarily mean I liked them. My favorites would be Agatha Christie's Poirot (for sentimental reasons), Vera, Foyle's War, Inspector Morse, and Broadchurch's first season. The 90s Maigret was very good - reminds me to revisit it.

      Ah, the Marshalsea? We just finished watching Little Dorrit again. That's amazing. Our local history isn't quite so grand - bootleggers and mountain feuding, for the most part.

      Thanks for reading!

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  5. Found you via your piece on John Uskglass. Wonderful writing.

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    1. Sorry for the delay - I was locked out of my account. And thank you! I've been quite puzzled by the amount of traffic that post receives. Where did you happen to run across it?

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    2. Your page is the 5th google result for "john uskglass" and 4th for "who is the raven king?"

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    3. Interesting. I'm surprised there are that many people googling that rather obscure topic.

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  6. HI Hannah. I have stumbled across your reviews of British crime shows a few times now in my efforts to rattle something out of my brain that just does not want to come forth. It seems like you enjoy all the same shows we do. For the life of me I can't remember which show it was (that a particular episode comes from, that is swirling around in my head with snippets of scenes) and the actress that i would stake my life on as being in it...according to IMDB...was not (Lesley Sharp). My husband can recall the same scenes as i do, so i know i am not making it up. and i absolutely cannot recall the faces of any of the other actors (which is just plain odd considering i remember so much my head is clogged with so much useless trivia and much of it on British Tv) If i were to describe the scenes, do you think you would care to attempt seeing if anything sounds familiar to you? I thought it might have been Inspector Lewis, but in going thru what i have seen of yours and the summaries from IMDB, thus far i'm not seeing it. Let me know. And i am enjoying your reviews, will have to check out the rest of your writings.

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    1. Might as well give it a shot.

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    2. ok, what i am remembering is there is a blonde woman (with longish blonde wavy hair...the one i would have sworn was Lesley Sharp) she is a free spirit type, hippie-ish, serene in demeanor and she has a business that has to do with plants/greenhouse. she was originally a suspect in the crime or knew the victim (which i am guessing was murder). the lead detective has pretty much ruled her out and has come to be friendly with her, and has gone to her place of business to visit with her and have tea (they are sitting in front of her green house/garden shed at a small table talking like platonic friends. i think i am also recalling that his colleagues are somewhat concerned about his relationship with her potentially interfering with the investigation. there is also another piece...there are other people being investigated...3 of them, and one woman (late 20s early 30s) in particular. she is estranged from her mother who is quite wealthy. she lives with these other 2 (a man and a woman)in what appears to be an abandoned buliding/loft type of structure. they live on the 2nd floor and you enter their unit via a long staircase on the outside of the building that runs along the outside wall. the young woman (i think has something to do with art maybe) and she seems to like the man in the situation but he has something going with the other woman, but they are keeping it quiet from the other one. but she sees them in an embrace and it disturbs her. the detective in some way finds out that this young woman is terminally ill (with what i can't remember) and the young woman returns to her mother's house to try to reconcile with her. i have no memory of the crime, or who died if it was a murder. and i can't visualize any faces. and i'm pretty sure these 2 snippets are from the same episode vs blending 2 shows into one...but i may be wrong.) does any of this mess sound even remotely familiar? thanks in advance for taking time to read this.

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